Context-free patent art.  This is really quite excellent.

Context-free patent art.  This is really quite excellent.

Twitter approves defensive patent strategy

Twitter approves defensive patent strategy:

The IPA is a new way to do patent assignment that keeps control in the hands of engineers and designers. It is a commitment from Twitter to our employees that patents can only be used for defensive purposes. We will not use the patents from employees’ inventions in offensive litigation without their permission. What’s more, this control flows with the patents, so if we sold them to others, they could only use them as the inventor intended.

While it’s a nice gesture, a couple of big question marks remain: (1) it looks like only employees will actually have standing to enforce this against the company, which kind of limits its utility if they still owe parallel contractual duties to act in the best interests of their employer; and (2) the scope of “Defensive Purpose” is quite broad - it includes offensive actions against any company that has filed a patent suit within the last decade (so, almost anyone) and actions “to deter a patent litigation threat”.  In other words, it might still encompass quite a lot of the tit-for-tat litigation going on between patentees wishing to negotiate more favourable licensing arrangements.

"“Do you understand that no one owns the Java programming language?” lead counsel Robert Van Nest..."

“Do you understand that no one owns the Java programming language?” lead counsel Robert Van Nest asked. Ellison began a longer answer, but Judge William Alsup interrupted him and said it was a “yes or no” question. Finally Ellison said, “I’m not sure.”

“And anyone can use it without royalty?” Van Nest followed up.

“I’m not sure,” Ellison said again.

Then Van Nest showed a video of Ellison receiving the same question on a deposition video and answering “That’s correct” to both.



- Day 2 of Oracle v Google.  See more coverage on Wired.

Image of the day: Amazon book availability by decade (from a...



Image of the day: Amazon book availability by decade (from a random sample of 2500).  If this is representative of the wider catalogue, this paints a very troubling picture of post-copyright reprinting.

Image of the day: Amazon book availability by decade (from a...

Image of the day: Amazon book availability by decade (from a random sample of 2500).  If this is representative of the wider catalogue, this paints a very troubling picture of post-copyright reprinting.

Image of the day: Amazon book availability by decade (from a...

Image of the day: Amazon book availability by decade (from a random sample of 2500).  If this is representative of the wider catalogue, this paints a very troubling picture of post-copyright reprinting.

Self-represented litigant #1403: the comic book guy.



Self-represented litigant #1403: the comic book guy.

Self-represented litigant #1403: the comic book guy.

Self-represented litigant #1403: the comic book guy.

Self-represented litigant #1403: the comic book guy.

Self-represented litigant #1403: the comic book guy.

Building spilling booksDavid Pescovitz,...




Building spilling books

David Pescovitz, boingboing.net

“Biografias,” an instal­la­tion by Ali­cia Mar­tin at Casa de Amer­i­ca, Madrid. “5,000 Books Pour Out of a Build­ing in Spain” (via Imag­i­nary Foun­da­tion)

This art installation in Madrid is simply fantastic.

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